Toll Free:
866-303-1411

13 Questions to Ask Your Kansas Car Accident Attorney

When you choose an attorney to help you press a car accident claim you want to be certain that he or she is the right attorney for you. Below you will find a list of 13 questions to ask each prospective attorney. Using these questions, it will be much easier to find the right attorney for you.

  1. What is your educational background?

    Education is important, and each prospective attorney should have no problem discussing their education and their concentration.

  2. Have you taken any continuing education courses in the past few years?

    The laws and legal environment are in a state of constant flux. The best attorneys spend much of their time taking continuing education courses in order to stay abreast of new laws and procedural changes. Make sure your attorney is doing his part to stay current.

  3. How long have you been in practice?

    Do you want an experienced attorney or an attorney who might not be as experienced but is young and hungry? How long an attorney has been practicing may make a difference in how he pursues your case.

  4. How many personal injury claims have you successfully settled?

    The majority of car accident injury claims in Kansas are settled out of court for a sum agreeable to both parties. Your attorney’s in-court experience is less important than his ability to negotiate with the insurance company on your behalf. Make sure to ask what percentage of his cases are settled out of court versus go to trial.

  5. Do you typically represent the injured persons or the insurance company, in a personal injury case?

    There are two facets to personal injury law: one focuses on the individual and the other focuses on protecting the insurance company’s interests. You want an attorney who focuses on assisting individuals.

  6. Would you be the sole attorney assigned to my case, or do you have an associate with whom you would share the case?

    Many people prefer a single point of contact when pursuing a personal injury claim. Others like the idea of an entire firm working on their case. Make sure the firm and attorney you choose meets your criteria.

  7. Do you anticipate my case going to trial?

    If an attorney anticipates that your case may need to go to trial, his experience as a trial lawyer becomes much more important.

  8. What is your experience as a trial attorney?

    If your case is one that will go to trial, make sure you attorney has the experience and ability to successful argue your claim in court.

  9. If I wish to avoid going to trial by accepting a lower settlement than you think we can recover, will you honor that wish?

    Your attorney is your advocate. Make sure that your attorney is willing to accept your decision even if he does not agree with that decision.

  10. If I wish to reject a settlement offer you think is fair, will you go to trial for a larger amount?

    See above.

  11. Will you accept my case on a contingency fee basis?

    Most personal injury claims in Kansas are accepted on contingency. This means that your attorney only gets paid if the insurance company decides to settle or you receive an award. It is important to understand the fee structure before agreeing to work with a Kansas car accident attorney.

  12. Do you charge a retainer fee?

    Some attorneys require a retainer before they will accept your case. This is especially true for cases that look like they will take a longer than normal period to successfully pursue. Once again, make sure you understand the attorney’s fee structure before agreeing to work with him.

  13. Are there any additional fees or potential expenses I should be made aware of?

    See above.

We are here to help you in your time of need. To discover more about the car accident claim process in Kansas, please explore this site. When you would like to speak with an expert car accident attorney familiar with Kansas law, please fill out the FREE car accident claim evaluation form and one of our attorneys will be in touch shortly.